Anne Frank Response To Literature Essay

Anne Frank Response To Literature Essay-19
The litany of blurbs—“a lasting testament to the indestructible nobility of the human spirit,” “an everlasting source of courage and inspiration”—is no more substantial than any other display of self-delusion. She had so much hope when I was ready to call it quits.

If Anne Frank had not perished in the criminal malevolence of Bergen-Belsen early in 1945, she would have marked her sixty-eighth birthday last June.

And even if she had not kept the extraordinary diary through which we know her it is likely that we would number her among the famous of this century—though perhaps not so dramatically as we do now. At thirteen, she felt her power; at fifteen, she was in command of it.

It is easy to imagine—had she been allowed to live—a long row of novels and essays spilling from her fluent and ripening pen.

We can be certain (as certain as one can be of anything hypothetical) that her mature prose would today be noted for its wit and acuity, and almost as certain that the trajectory of her work would be closer to that of Nadine Gordimer, say, than to that of Francoise Sagan. This was more than an exaggerated adolescent flourish.

Weakened by brutality, chaos, and hunger, fifty thousand men and women—insufficiently clothed, tormented by lice—succumbed, many to the typhus epidemic. Overhead the bombers, roaring to their destinations, make the house quake; sometimes the bombs fall terrifyingly close. But the diary in itself, richly crammed though it is with incident and passion, cannot count as Anne Frank’s story.

Anne Frank’s final diary entry, written on August 1, 1944, ends introspectively—a meditation on a struggle for moral transcendence set down in a mood of wistful gloom. if only there were no other people in the world.” Those curiously self-subduing ellipses are the diarist’s own; they are more than merely a literary effect—they signify a child’s muffled bleat against confinement, the last whimper of a prisoner in a cage. I’ve asked myself again and again whether it wouldn’t have been better if we hadn’t gone into hiding, if we were dead now and didn’t have to go through this misery. All in all, the diary is a chronicle of trepidation, turmoil, alarm. A story may not be said to be a story if the end is missing.

In December, two thousand and ninety-three female prisoners perished, from starvation and exhaustion, in the women’s camp; early in January, Edith Frank expired.

But Soviet forces were hurtling toward Auschwitz, and in November the order went out to conceal all evidences of gassing and to blow up the crematoria.

She and her sister, Margot, were among three thousand six hundred and fifty-nine women transported by cattle car from Auschwitz to the merciless conditions of Bergen-Belsen, a barren tract of mud. There is, besides, a startlingly precocious comprehension of the progress of the war on all fronts.

In a cold, wet autumn, they suffered through nights on flooded straw in overcrowded tents, without light, surrounded by latrine ditches, until a violent hailstorm tore away what had passed for shelter. The survival of the little group in hiding is crucially linked to the timing of the Allied invasion.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Anne Frank Response To Literature Essay

The Latest from jivteplo.ru ©