Research Paper Math Education

Research Paper Math Education-36
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Mathematics, in the common lay view, is a static discipline based on formulas taught in the school subjects of arithmetic, geometry, algebra, and calculus.

But outside public view, mathematics continues to grow at a rapid rate, spreading into new fields and spawning new applications.

The guide to this growth is not calculation and formulas but an open-ended search for pattern.

Mathematics has traditionally been described as the science of number and shape.

Number and shape—arithmetic and geometry—are but two of many media in which mathematicians work.

Active mathematicians seek patterns wherever they arise. Thanks to computer graphics, much of the mathematician's search for patterns is now guided by what one can really see with the eye, whereas nineteenth-century mathematical giants like Gauss and Poincaré had to depend more on seeing with their mind's eye. “I see” has always had two distinct meanings: to perceive with the eye and to understand with the mind. For centuries the mind has dominated the eye in the hierarchy of mathematical practice; today the balance is being restored as mathematicians find new ways to see patterns, both with the eye and with the mind. Change in the practice of mathematics forces re-examination of mathematics education. To learn more or modify/prevent the use of cookies, see our Cookie Policy and Privacy Policy.“He just saw further than the rest of us.” The subject of this remark, cyberneticist Norbert Wiener, is one of many exceptional scientists who broke the bonds of tradition to create entirely new domains for mathematicians to explore. In the last century alone, the number of mathematical disciplines has grown at an exponential rate; examples include the ideas of Georg Cantor on transfinite sets, Sonja Kovalevsky on differential equations, Alan Turing on computability, Emmy Noether on abstract algebra, and, most recently, Benoit Mandelbrot on fractals. The Divine Proportion: A Study in Mathematical Beauty. To the public these new domains of mathematics are terra incognita. By continuing to use this site, you consent to the use of cookies.We use cookies to offer you a better experience, personalize content, tailor advertising, provide social media features, and better understand the use of our services.

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